2015 Programme

2015 partiipants (2)The Third International Social Realism Symposium

29 June – 1 July 2015

International Organising Committee Brian Barrett, State University of New York College at Cortland, USA

John Beck, Homerton College, University of Cambridge, UK Johan Muller, University of Cape Town, South Africa

Elizabeth Rata, University of Auckland, NZ Leesa Wheelahan, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto, Canada Michael Young, Institute of Education, University College London, UK

Programme

Monday 29 June 2015
10:00 am – 11:00 am

Upper Hall

Symposium registration and refreshments (tea and coffee)
11:00 am – 11:30 am

Upper Hall

Symposium welcome and tribute to Dr. Rob Moore
11:30 am – 1:00 pm

Upper Hall

Theorising powerful knowledge
– Elizabeth Rata (University of Auckland, New Zealand), The three dimensions of the social realist research programme: Theory, empirical studies, and philosophy – Chris Corbel (University of Melbourne, Australia), The phraseological construction of meanings of knowledge – John Morgan (University of Auckland, New Zealand) and David Lambert (University College London, UK), ‘For knowledge. But what knowledge’? Confronting social realism’s curriculum problem
– Brian Barrett, Chair
1:00 pm – 2:00 pm

Prioress’s Room

Lunch
2:00 pm – 3:30 pm

Upper Hall

Recontextualising knowledge for the curriculum – Walter Parker (University of Washington, USA), Content selection in advanced secondary school courses – Jeanne Gamble (University of Cape Town, South Africa), Masking hierarchy: The relation between curriculum structure and knowledge structure – Jim Hordern (Bath Spa University, UK), Recontextualisation and professionalizing regions

– Leesa Wheelahan, Chair

3:30 pm – 4:00 pm

Upper Hall

Break (tea, coffee and assorted cakes)
4:00 pm – 5:30 pm

Upper Hall

Politics of knowledge, curriculum and identity

– Andrew Hodgkins (University of Alberta, Canada), ‘Emptying out knowledge’? Exploring the Pedagogical Pathways of Indian Residential Schooling Curriculum in Canadian schools

– Leonel Lim (National Institute of Education, Singapore), State ideology and the regulation of knowledge: The pedagogic recontextualisation of critical thinking in an anti-liberal state

– Alexis Siteine (University of Auckland, New Zealand), Knowledge and identity in the school curriculum

– Michael Young, Chair

 

 

Tuesday 30 June 2015
9:30 am – 11:00 am

Upper Hall

Professional knowledge and curriculum design – Michael Young (University College London, UK), Professional work as knowledgeable practice: Contrasts and convergences – David Guile (University College London, UK), Professional knowledge and professional practice as continuous recontextualisation: A social practice perspective of undergraduate Engineering

– Stephanie Allais (University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa), What makes a good occupational curriculum?

– Johan Muller, Chair

11:00 am – 11:30 am

Upper Hall

Break (tea, coffee and biscuits)
11:30 am – 1:00 pm

Upper Hall

Durkheimian analyses of knowledge, curriculum and practice – Leesa Wheelahan (University of Toronto, Canada), A Durkheimian analysis of knowledge and institutions and the implications for vocational education in Australia – Kim Quy (University of Melbourne, Australia), Higher education in Vietnam 1986-2013: Social order, knowledge and the individual – Lynne Slonimsky (University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa), Learning from Durkheim: Changing moral orders, changing curricula, changing the ordering principles of teachers’ practices – Graham McPhail, Chair
1:00 pm – 2:00 pm

Prioress’s Room

Lunch
2:00 pm – 3:30 pm

Upper Hall

Curriculum, pedagogy and teachers’ professional knowledge – Maria Timberlake, Anne Burns Thomas and Brian Barrett (State University of New York College at Cortland, USA), Flipping the script: Exploring the impact of curriculum modules on access to knowledge and teacher professionalism – Yael Shalem (University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa), Scripted lesson plans – What is visible and invisible in invisible pedagogy?
– Christine Counsell (University of Cambridge, UK), ‘Futures 3’ in practice? Social realism and the curricular achievement of England’s history teachers – Elizabeth Rata, Chair
3:30 pm – 4:00 pm

Upper Hall

Break (tea, coffee and assorted cakes)
4:00 pm – 5:30 pm

Upper Hall

Regulating classroom discourse – Roger Firth (University of Oxford, UK), Disciplinary constraint and the design of active geographical learning – Paula Ensor and Zain Davis (University of Cape Town, South Africa), Ritual in pedagogy – Barbara Ormond (University of Auckland, New Zealand), Knowledge at the cliff-edge: Disturbances to the centrality of knowledge in History education – Ursula Hoadley, Chair
7:00 pm

Upper Hall

Third International Social Realism Symposium dinner (Advance registration required)

 

 

Wednesday 1 July 2015
9:30 am – 11:00 am

Upper Hall

Curriculum planning and reconstruction in higher education – Johan Muller and Ursula Hoadley (University of Cape Town, South Africa), The lay of our land: Dynamics in the field of practice of ‘curriculum theory’ – Richard Pountney (Sheffield Hallam University, UK), Autonomy and consensus-seeking in course planning and approval in higher education – Suellen Shay (University of Cape Town, South Africa), Curriculum reform in higher education and the problem of inequality – John Beck, Chair
11:00 am – 11:30 am

Upper Hall

Break (tea, coffee and biscuits)
11:30 am – 1:00 pm

Upper Hall

21st century schools and curriculum – Ben Kotzee (University of Birmingham, UK), Disciplinary knowledge and 21st century skills (or: Why you can’t just Google it) – Graham McPhail (University of Auckland, New Zealand), Problems of curriculum selection and progression in a ‘21st Century’ new secondary school – Lyn Yates (University of Melbourne, Australia), Disciplinarity and History
– Anne Burns Thomas, Chair
1:00 pm – 2:00 pm

Prioress’s Room

Lunch and symposium closing
2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

Upper Hall

Open planning session for Fourth International Social Realism Symposium and edited collection

 

 

 

Abstracts

 

The three dimensions of the social realist research programme: Theory, empirical studies, and philosophy Elizabeth Rata

Since the 1990s a creative research programme loosely referred to as ‘social realism’ has developed ideas to promote a progressive approach to teaching academic knowledge. It is intended that this will contribute to the academic achievement of traditionally disadvantaged students. My presentation will outline some of the research questions for this line of enquiry by directing attention to the purpose of access to powerful knowledge. This requires engaging with the politics of knowledge.

 

The phraseological construction of meanings of knowledge

Chris Corbel

This paper contributes to debates concerning the ‘weakening’ of knowledge in education policy by presenting the results of a lexical semantic investigation of knowledge and skills as keywords and as a key phrase in a collection of Australian vocational education policy documents over a forty year period. It reveals the extent to which current meanings of knowledge have emerged from its associations in phrases with other words, especially skills. It suggests that the ‘relative morphological flexibility’ of skill helps to account for the increasing dominance of skills over knowledge in policy discourse.

‘For knowledge. But what knowledge?’ Confronting Social Realism’s curriculum problem

John Morgan and David Lambert

Writers working in the field of social realism have argued that there is a need to reclaim knowledge and overcome knowledge-blindness in education. But the key question of curriculum studies remains: what knowledge should be taught in schools? Whilst there has been a broad agreement to favour knowledge that has particular properties currently found in the disciplines, this still does not allow an answer that is fine-grained enough to be useful at the level of curriculum making. This paper will attempt to confront social realism’s curriculum planning problem head on through an examination of two school subjects. Our approach will be to place debates about the teaching of music and geography in cultural, political and historical contexts, since that is where decisions about the content of the curriculum are made.

 

Content selection in advanced secondary school courses

Walter Parker

Advanced secondary school courses present a content selection conundrum. Judicious content selection is needed if students are to learn subject matter meaningfully, but the vast breadth of tested material in these courses promotes nearly the opposite: “test-prep” teaching and superficial curriculum “coverage.” This paper contributes to a theory of content selection aimed at meaningful learning (Bransford), curricular structure (Bruner, Schwab), and knowledge and power in curriculum practice (Young). It also presents the practical tool used to select core content for a government and politics course—an “advanced” course where selecting anything for emphasis can be perceived as too costly.

Masking hierarchy: The relation between curriculum structure and knowledge structure

Jeanne Gamble

Hierarchy and generalisation are generally recognised as constitutive features of formal specialised knowledge, but the relation between them is indistinct, thus prompting an enquiry as to the nature of hierarchy in both knowledge structure and curriculum structure. The paper reviews different bodies of literature that each claim a lineage to the theoretical work of Basil Bernstein and yet conceptualise hierarchy in very different ways, to argue that generic cumulative orders imposed on all and/or any knowledge field serve to mask rather than support the substantive nature of knowledge structure.

 

Recontextualisation and professionalising regions

Jim Hordern

This paper illustrates how the Bernsteinian notion of the ‘region’ and the concept of recontextualisation can provide a framework for analysis of how knowledge is constituted and iterated in contrasting professions and higher-level vocations, and identifies the implications of certain types of region and recontextualisation process for practitioner access to valuable specialised knowledge. Examples are taken from studies of occupations facing jurisdictional challenges and/or engaged in professionalisation projects, including project management, human resource management, chartered surveying, early years education and teaching.

 

 

‘Emptying out knowledge’? Exploring the Pedagogical Pathways of Indian Residential Schooling Curriculum in Canadian schools

Andrew Hodgkins

This paper presents a case study of the pedagogical pathways associated with the history of Indian Residential Schools in Canada. Drawing from Bernstein, I critically evaluate the production and legitimation of recent changes to curriculum, beginning with national events that have sought to legitimate subjective experiences of knowers, and ending with how these events have resulted in the implementation of mandatory curriculum in schools across Canada. I conclude by considering ways to reform the new curricula. Implications for advancing the work of social realism include considering conditions of knowledge production relating to race and colonisation.

 

State ideology and the regulation of knowledge: The pedagogic recontextualisation of critical thinking in an anti-liberal state

Leonel Lim

Singapore schools have recently emphasized the teaching of critical thinking across the national curriculum. These efforts, however, are not without tensions and contradictions. Given that such a curriculum ideal is underpinned by liberal discourses of democracy and autonomy, what form does it assume in a one-party state with a deliberately weak and underdeveloped language of individual rights? In a highly stratified education system, how are all students being taught what has traditionally been classified as “high-status” knowledge? Using ethnographic data from a public school, this paper explores the social conditions and processes through which critical thinking as “powerful knowledge” becomes evacuated of its emancipatory potential.

 

Knowledge and identity in the school curriculum

Alexis Siteine

This paper outlines a study that examines the inclusion of student identity affirmation in the national curricula of three Pacific nations with educational, political, and economic ties. They are New Zealand, The Republic of Nauru, and The Cook Islands. The conceptual tools of knowledge differentiation and culturalism are used to understand and interrogate identity related directives and guidelines that are encoded in curriculum. While the inclusion of identity is intended to enhance students’ academic success, I propose that the enactment of this directive leads to symbolic violence by subverting the ability of the school to provide equitable access to knowledge and by trapping students within their social experiences.

 

Flipping the script: Exploring the impact of curriculum modules on access to knowledge and teacher professionalism

Maria Timberlake, Anne Burns Thomas and Brian Barrett

This qualitative study examines how teachers have perceived and experienced the curriculum modules developed by the New York State Department of Education to support teachers’ implementation of Common Core State Standards currently in place across much of the USA. While implementation of the modules is officially voluntary their adoption has proven attractive, particularly given New York’s rushed implementation of the standards and their link to accountability measures associated with schools’ examination results. We are most interested in how teachers understand and apply the modules in teaching a range of students, including students of color, low-income students and students with disabilities.

 

Scripted lesson plans – What is visible and invisible in visible pedagogy?

Yael Shalem

Specification of curriculum in a form of scripted lesson plans is propagated as a powerful way of changing teachers’ practice, intending to make visible curriculum content and a desired form of pedagogy. By analysing the way in which Bernstein’s fields of the pedagogic device regulate teacher knowledge, I show why this form of teacher development is weak. I argue that understanding of the criteria of what matters in a topic requires teachers to know key aspects of all three fields of knowledge. This knowledge makes visible that which a teacher needs to follow when teaching from a scripted lesson.  My argument refers to empirical data from Grade 3 English Language classrooms.

 

 

 

 

 

 

‘Futures 3’ in practice? Social realism and the curricular achievement of England’s history teachers

Christine Counsell

Over the last two decades, England’s history teachers have built a published discourse around curricular approaches to teaching disciplinary knowledge. These teachers have explored ways of teaching students to discern the socio-historical bases of knowledge while avoiding its reduction to such bases and to construct historical argument while attending to secure substantive knowledge. Much of this has occurred in reaction against earlier trends in history education which often fostered intellectual production at the expense of educational reproduction. This paper will examine these history teachers’ published work in the light of social realism and Young’s ‘Future 3’.

 

Disciplinary constraint and the design of active geographical learning Roger Firth

The pedagogic (and epistemic-pedagogic) device bring a particular lens from the sociology of knowledge to the way that teachers interpret and recontextualise the official curriculum and cultivate specific knower dispositions in their classroom through their pedagogic practice. This article reflects on the usefulness of the device as an analytical frame before a consideration of why it is not specialised enough in relation to disciplinary knowledge and specifically the subject of geography and the need to recruit more fine-grained descriptions of knowledge in the support of epistemic access and social reconstruction.

Ritual in pedagogy

Paula Ensor and Zain Davis

This paper describes work towards the development of a framework which will allow us to theorise the place and effect of ritual in pedagogy. Our approach builds on two trajectories of thought in relation to ritual. One trajectory reworks a neo-Durkheimian approach to ritual in order to consider its effects in pedagogy. The other follows a cognitive science perspective in relation to the same theoretical task. Acoustic counting in the Foundation Phase has been selected as the empirical focus for analysis in this paper.

 

Knowledge at the cliff-edge: Disturbances to the centrality of knowledge in History education

Barbara Ormond

The centrality of knowledge in the study of History in New Zealand has been significantly disturbed in recent years. Through the devolution of power over knowledge selection to teachers coupled with a competency discourse in curriculum, and assessment as a driver for narrowing curriculum, teachers’ conceptions of the role and importance of knowledge have altered. While teachers may be expected in their selections to give consideration to which historical ideas and contexts may be most valuable for students to learn, such considerations are largely absent from teachers’ explanations for their choices. This paper reports upon empirical evidence from interviews of History teachers.

 

Professional Work as knowledgeable practice: Contrasts and convergences

Michael Young

This paper will explore the contrasts and possible convergences between the ‘knowledge-based’ approach that builds on the ideas of Basil Bernstein that I developed with Johan Muller in the book Knowledge, Expertise and the Professions and the ‘practice-based’ approach developed by David Guile in his chapter in the book which draws on CHAT theory and the philosophy of McDowell and Brandom.

Professional knowledge and professional practice as continuous recontextualisation: A social practice perspective of undergraduate Engineering

David Guile

The concept of social practice will be used to show that theoretical knowledge and practical activity have a mediated, that is mutually informing, rather than binary relationship with one another. This perspective will then be used to: a) distinguish my use of the concept of ‘recontextualisation’ compared with how it is used by Bernstein; and b) discuss the similarities and differences between Michael Young and my approach to the theory-practice relationship and its implications for professional formation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What makes a good occupational curriculum?

Stephanie Allais

Sociologists of education increasingly emphasize the importance of theoretical knowledge in education, and the role of organized bodies of knowledge—subjects and disciplines—in the curriculum. Sociologists of the professions emphasize the importance of defining and controlling bodies of knowledge in as the basis for the legitimization of occupational autonomy. These ideas are opposed by a popular notion that both occupational and professional education should be more directly focused on the immediate needs of workplaces, and many vocational and professional curricula are dominated by ideas about the cultivation of practical wisdom by means of action research, personal observations, fieldwork, and experience in the site of practice. The empty genericism often listed by employers when specifying required traits of workers is not useful for curriculum design, but nonetheless, successful vocational education systems have a strong role for employers. Resolving these tensions practice, to enable the development of curricula which present a strong knowledge base from which to develop expert practice requires insight into the nature of work. Divisions of labour within and between occupations, currently and in the past, have shaped and continue to shape the development of occupational and professional knowledge. There are many forms of work today which are knowledge-based in various ways, but which do not enjoy the autonomy, status, and high salaries traditionally enjoyed by the professions, perhaps partly due to lack of control over the knowledge-base of their work but also due to power relations in labour markets and workplaces. Work changes and the knowledge required shifts, with some occupations and even professions requiring less knowledge than before, and others more. This paper reports on part of a project which aims to analyze the knowledge bases of different occupational and professional qualifications, in terms of how they were produced and developed historically, and their relationships with different occupational divisions of labour and power relationships in workplaces. The paper explores how we can hold together a notion of powerful knowledge with shifting notions of occupations and work.

 

A Durkheimian analysis of knowledge and institutions and the implications for vocational education in Australia

Leesa Wheelahan

This paper argues that institutions are intrinsic to creating, elaborating and codifying theoretical knowledge, and that we require a theory of institutions to accompany our theories about the nature of theoretical knowledge. Moreover, institutions mediate access to powerful knowledge, and we cannot be indifferent to the nature of institutions in postsecondary education. It draws on Durkheim’s analysis of the professions and Bernstein’s analysis of the pedagogic device and regions to explore the impact of markets on technical and further education institutes in Australia.

 

Knowledge and social change: Curriculum reforms in higher education in Vietnam between 1986 and 2013

Kim Quy

This project is interested in values of the larger question about the roles of HE curricular knowledge in a developing country like Vietnam after 1986. It examines and analyses the development of curriculum policy in higher education in Vietnam during the years 1986 and 2013. Drawing on the works of Emile Durkheim on the relation between social change and knowledge and the later elaborations of the social realists, the study attempts to make sense of the particular trends and patterns of curricular knowledge and the consequences this may have on the students.

 

Learning from Durkheim: Changing moral orders, changing curricula, changing the ordering principles of teachers’ practices

Lynne Slonimsky

The central problematic of this paper is a curriculum paradox that arises in the transition from a repressive system of education in an authoritarian state to the kind of system required to develop capabilities for democratic citizenship. The paradox is that teachers who were systematically schooled and trained to be heteronomous in the old system are required to become autonomous and to promote the development of autonomous learners in the new. The paper is concerned with the transition to democracy in South Africa. To address this paradox, the paper develops a discussion of Durkheim’s education theory courses for teachers. A discussion of Durkheim’s analysis of the changing moral order in the French education system at the beginning of the twentieth century, the explanation and justification he gave to teachers for the importance of education theory, and the method of analysis he modeled in his lectures, are presented. These three aspects of his lectures are exceptionally generative for describing, analyzing and engaging with the manifestations of the curriculum paradox in South Africa, a century later.

 

 

The lay of our land: Dynamics in the field of practice of ‘curriculum theory’

Johan Muller and Ursula Hoadley

‘Curriculum theory’ is a concept mostly taken at face value by scholars working in the field of curriculum. It is periodically said to be ‘in crisis’. Its normative and analytical lineaments are the object of discussion when it becomes a topic in the research literature, or when it is used as a resource for analytical purposes. As such, it can be studied through publications (for example, Hoadley 2010). But is ‘curriculum theory’ a body of knowledge? Does it have a knowledge structure? Is it ‘real’? In this paper, we explore these question through a preliminary analysis of publicly available course descriptions of 10 public universities in South Africa, at the postgraduate but pre-Masters degree level of study.

 

Autonomy and consensus-seeking in course planning and approval in higher education Richard Pountney

This doctoral study examines knowledge practices in course planning in higher education including the institutional processes by which courses are granted licence to operate. Drawing on the pedagogic device and the autonomy dimension of Legitimation Code Theory, it examines teachers’ experiences and how the curriculum emerges and changes. The analysis illuminates the knowledge structures and coding orientations of curriculum development knowledge and what constitutes legitimate ‘know-how’ as well as ‘know-what’ in curriculum design in these contexts. It finds curricular texts to poorly represent teachers’ pedagogic intentions. An alternative coherence model of curriculum development, based on a consensual principle, is proposed.

 

Curriculum reform in higher education and the problem of inequality

Suellen Shay

The paper draws on two cases studies of contemporary curriculum reform: Hong Kong and South Africa. Recent significant political transitions have given rise to wide-ranging policy proposals for higher education. The focus here is policy proposals for a restructured undergraduate curriculum – a shift from a three-year to a four-year bachelors degree. Theoretically speaking, in both policies pacing disrupted in order to effect changes in selection. An additional year has been added to allow for a different kind of curriculum. What emerges in the analysis is that while the reforms appear similar the underlying logic of these reforms is fundamentally different.

 

Disciplinary knowledge and 21st century skills (or: Why you can’t just Google it) Ben Kotzee

Recently, anti-disciplinary approaches to the curriculum have been organising under the slogan that schools should not teach facts, but ’21st Century Skills’. Advocates of 21st Century Skills hold that, since they are now armed with Google, children need not learn facts. In this paper, I present a report from a new front in the skills vs knowledge wars: the debate over whether cognitive aids like Google ‘supersize’ our minds (Clark, 2008) or whether they, instead, limit it. Responding to Clark, I argue that cognitive extension makes great demands on the knowledge (including subject knowledge) of the user of the technology, thereby re-asserting the importance of knowledge pure and simple.

 

Problems of curriculum selection and progression in a ‘21st Century’ new secondary school

Graham McPhail

This paper reports on the initial stages of a three year empirical study of a new secondary school in New Zealand. The school is taking an ‘innovative’ approach to curriculum design and pedagogy reflecting the Ministry of Education’s preferences for 21st century learning. The initial data will be considered within a framework informed by ideas from the social realist literature.

 

Disciplinarity and History

Lyn Yates

This paper draws on an ARC funded project that sought to investigate knowledge and knowledge-building across school, university and research today. In this paper I show that in relation to school curriculum the selection of history content cannot be derived from the discipline itself but that the selection is nevertheless a central element of history’s purpose in the school curriculum. And in relation to university curriculum I show that current reforms are more threatening to history as a field with strong disciplinarity but one built on ‘fuzzy boundaries’ than to physics which we are also studying.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bionotes

 

Stephanie Allais is Associate Professor at the Centre for Researching Education and Labour at the University of the Witwatersrand. Her research interests are in the sociology of education, policy, education and development, curriculum, sociology of knowledge, and political economy of education, focused on relationships between education and work. She has researched and published extensively on qualifications frameworks as a new driver of education policy internationally, and her recent book, Selling Education Out: National qualifications frameworks and the neglect of knowledge explores the curriculum and political economy implications of this phenomenon. stephanie.matseleng@gmail.com

 

Brian Barrett is Associate Professor in the Foundations & Social Advocacy Department, School of Education, at the State University of New York College at Cortland and also serves as Graduate Research Coordinator for Cortland’s Urban Recruitment of Educators Program. He recently co-edited Knowledge and the Future of the Curriculum: International Studies in Social Realism with Elizabeth Rata (2014, Palgrave Macmillan). Brian.Barrett@cortland.edu

 

Anne Burns Thomas is an associate professor in the Foundations and Social Advocacy Department in the School of Education at SUNY College at Cortland. Additionally, she coordinates the C.U.R.E. program, a comprehensive urban teacher education effort. Her research interests include teacher preparation for high needs schools, and the role of foundations of education in teacher preparation. Anne.BurnsThomas@cortland.edu

 

Chris Corbel is a lecturer in vocational education, and a doctoral student at the Melbourne Graduate School of Education at the University of Melbourne. His research interests are on the lexical semantics of vocational education policy analysis, with a particular focus on focus on knowledge and skills in the vocational curriculum. corbelc@unimelb.edu.au

 

Christine Counsell is Senior Lecturer in the University of Cambridge Faculty of Education and Editor of Teaching History.  A former secondary school history teacher, she has been training history teachers for 20 years. Experienced in drafting history national curricula in England, Christine has worked in diverse international contexts, most recently training every history department in Singapore, and also supporting Turkish-Cypriot and Greek-Cypriot history teachers in collaborative, discipline-led planning and building curriculum-planning capacity in a community of history teachers in Lebanon. cc247@cam.ac.uk

 

Zain Davis is based in the School of Education at the University of Cape Town. His research interests include language and mathematics; textual analysis; continuing professional development of mathematics teachers. Zain.davis@uct.ac.za

 

Paula Ensor is based in the School of Education at the University of Cape Town.

Her research interests are in the sociology of education (especially with respect to curriculum and pedagogy and the recontextualising of educational practices); mathematics education; teacher education, education for citizenship and social justice. Paula.ensor@uct.ac.za

 

Roger Firth is an associate professor in Geography and Environmental Education at the University of Oxford. He works in Teacher Education. As a researcher he is interested in all aspects of curriculum and pedagogy in geography and environmental education, knowledge and its impact on curriculum and pedagogy and issues of social justice in education. roger.firth@education.ox.ac.uk

 

Jeanne Gamble is a senior lecturer in Adult Education in the School of Education, University of Cape Town. Her theoretical and research interests focus on the relation between knowledge and practice in professional and vocational work and in their formal curricula. gamble@mweb.co.za

 

David Guile is Head of the Department of Education, Practice and Society, IOE-UCL, and Co-Director of the Centre for Engineering and Education, UCL. His interests are professional, vocational and workplace learning, in particular inter-occupational working and learning. He has investigated them in the Creative, Financial and Pharmaceutical sectors, and is currently doing so in the engineering sector. D.Guile@ioe.ac.uk

 

Ursula Hoadley is an associate professor in the School of Education at the University of Cape Town. Her research areas are curriculum, pedagogy and teachers work. She focuses in particular on primary schooling processes in contexts of poverty. Ursulahoadley@gmail.com

 

Andrew Hodgkins graduated with a PhD in Educational Policy Studies at the University of Alberta in 2013. He is currently researching vocational education and training partnerships involving Arctic resource extractive industries, and teaches part-time as both a sessional instructor at various universities and as a high school science teacher in Edmonton. hodgkins@ualberta.ca

 

Jim Hordern is a Senior Lecturer at Bath Spa University. He is interested in various aspects of professional and vocational education. Recent projects have focused on higher apprenticeships in England, teacher education reforms, and the professional knowledge of early years practitioners. j.hordern@bathspa.ac.uk

 

Ben Kotzee is a lecturer in the School of Education at the University of Birmingham. He works on issues in the philosophy of education; in particular he studies the nature and development of the intellectual virtues. In addition, he works on the nature of expertise in the professions. He is Co-Investigator on a three year AHRC project on Practical Wisdom in Medicine and Principal Investigator on a project for the Spencer Foundation on Intellectual and Moral Virtue. He is the editor of Education and the Growth of Knowledge (Wiley-Blackwell, 2013). H.B.Kotzee@bham.ac.uk

 

David Lambert is a former secondary school geography teacher (1974-1986), teacher trainer and chief executive of the Geographical Association (2002-2012). He is currently Professor of Geography Education and leads the GeoCapabilities project (www.geocapabilities.org). He Chairs the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo) in the UK and is co-edotor of Geography. In 2015 he was awarded the Royal Geographical Society Taylor and Francis Award for Leadership. David.Lambert@ioe.ac.uk

 

Leonel Lim is Assistant Professor of Curriculum, Teaching and Learning at the National Institute of Education, Singapore (leonel.lim@nie.edu.sg). He is the author of Knowledge, Control and Critical Thinking in Singapore (Routledge, 2015), and co-editor (with Michael W. Apple) of a forthcoming volume titled The Strong State and Curriculum Reform (Routledge). leonel.lim@gmail.com

 

Graham McPhail has recently taken up a music lectureship at the Faculty of Education, The University of Auckland. With Elizabeth Rata his current research is focused on conceptual progression in curriculum and pedagogy design. He has recently published in the International Journal of Music Education, Research Studies in Music Education, the British Journal of Music Education, the New Zealand Journal of Educational Studies, and Curriculum Matters. He currently has papers in-press with the British Journal of Sociology of Education and the British Educational Research Journal. g.mcphail@auckland.ac.nz

 

John Morgan taught geography in schools between 1988 and 2000, before leading geography teacher education at the University of Bristol and working at the Institute of Education (London). His most recent book is Teaching Secondary Geography as if the Planet Matters (Routledge 2010). John.morgan@auckland.ac.nz

 

Johan Muller is Professor Emeritus in Curriculum in the School of Education, University of Cape Town. He has published in the area of curriculum theory and policy, focusing on schooling as well as higher education. Johan.muller@uct.ac.za

 

Barbara Ormond is a senior lecturer in the Faculty of Education, The University of Auckland. She lectures in secondary teacher education in the disciplines of History, Art History, Classical Studies and Social Studies. Her current research, in the field of History education, investigates the framing of knowledge in curricula and the impacts of assessment on knowledge and pedagogy. Research into pedagogies for interpreting visual evidence is a further interest. b.ormond@auckland.ac.nz

 

Walter Parker is Professor of Curriculum and Instruction and, by courtesy, Political Science at the University of Washington in Seattle. He studies the depth-breadth problem in curriculum development and, more generally, civic education. He is a Fellow of the American Educational Research Association, and his books include Educating the Democratic Mind, Teaching Democracy, and Social Studies Today. denver@u.washington.edu

 

 

Richard Pountney, SFHEA, is Teaching Fellow at Sheffield Hallam University and teaches the Education Doctorate and curriculum studies on the Masters in Education. He has led the international MSc Technology, Innovation and Change since 2005. He was curriculum associate to the HEA Subject Centre for Sociology, Anthropology and Politics (CSAP), 2008-11. r.p.pountney@shu.ac.uk

 

Thi Kim Quy Nguyen is currently a PhD candidate at Melbourne Graduate School of Education, the University of Melbourne. thikqn@unimelb.student.edu

 

Elizabeth Rata is an associate professor in the Faculty of Education at the University of Auckland. She is also the Director of the Knowledge and Education Research Unit (KERU) and author of The Politics of Knowledge in Education (Routledge). She recently co-edited Knowledge and the Future of the Curriculum: International Studies in Social Realism with Brian Barrett (2014, Palgrave Macmillan). e.rata@auckland.ac.nz

 

Yael Shalem is an associate professor of education at the University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa. Her research interests include professional knowledge, curriculum, teacher education and teacher work. She is co-leading a professional knowledge project, based at the REAL centre at Wits (Researching Education and Labour), which investigates the relation between professional knowledge, curriculum, labour market trends and labour process. Yael.Shalem@wits.ac.za

 

Suellen Shay is Associate Professor and Dean in the Centre for Higher Education Development (CHED) at the University of Cape Town.  Her career in CHED since 1989 has spanned a range of types of development work, including language development, curriculum development, and staff and institutional development. Her research attempts to bring the theoretical frameworks of sociology of education to an understanding of higher education as social practice, specifically focusing on assessment and more recently knowledge and curriculum. Suellen.shay@uct.ac.za

 

Alexis Siteine is a senior lecturer in the School of Critical Studies in Education, Faculty of Education at The University of Auckland. Her current research focuses on theorising the relationship between identity, knowledge and curriculum from a social realist perspective. Recent projects include Social Sciences curriculum development and implementation in the Republic of Nauru. a.siteine@auckland.ac.nz

 

Lynne Slonimsky lectures in Curriculum Studies at the University of the Witwatersrand. lynnejohnslo@gmail.com 

 

Maria Timberlake is an assistant professor at the State University of New York, Cortland. Her research interests include academic access, perceptions of competency for students with significant cognitive disabilities, and experiences of teachers as policy implementers. She serves as Associate Editor for Creative Works for Review of Disability Studies, an International Journal. Maria.Timberlake@cortland.edu

 

Leesa Wheelahan is the William G. Davis Chair in the Department of Leadership, Higher and Adult Education, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto. Her work focuses on the role of theoretical knowledge in curriculum, particularly in the vocational education and training sector. Leesa.Wheelahan@utoronto.ca

 

Lyn Yates is Professor of Curriculum in the Melbourne Graduate School of Education. Her books include Australia’s Curriculum Dilemmas (MUP) and Curriculum in Today’s World (Routledge)L.yates@unimelb.edu.au

 

Michael Young is Professor of Education at University College London Institute of Education. He is currently involved with David Guile (UCLIOE) and colleagues in the Faculty of Engineering in developing a MSc in Engineering Education. His forthcoming book with Johan Muller (University of Cape Town)

Curriculum and the Specialisation of Knowledge will be published by Routledge in early 2016. M.Young@ioe.ac.uk